Skip to content
  • Kathryn Ibata-Arens DePaul University
  • Akira Igata Center for Rule-making Strategies, Tama University
  • Keisuke Inoue FabLab KandaNishikicho
  • Erick Nielson C Javier National Defense College of the Philippines
  • Elsa B. Kania Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security
  • Margaret E. Kosal Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Edward Parker RAND Corporation
  • Willem Thorbecke Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry
  • Mariko Togashi Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies
  • Takahiro Tsuchiya Kyoto University of Advanced Science
  • Mason Venturo Delta Air Lines

MEDIA QUERIES

Georgette Almeida
Executive Assistant
(808) 521-6745

Issues & Insights Vol. 21, SR 1 – 21st Century Technologies, Geopolitics, and the US-Japan Alliance: Recognizing Game-changing Potential 

Key Findings

Throughout the month of October 2020, with support from the US Embassy Tokyo, the Pacific Forum cohosted with the Center for Rule-Making Strategies at Tama University, the Keio University Global Research Institute, and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology a series of virtual panel discussions on “Game Changing Technologies and the US-Japan Alliance.” Over 280 individuals joined the 10 sessions – 7 closed door and 3 public panels – that examined issues such as artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, big data, cybersecurity, drones, quantum computing, robots, and 3-D printing. A conversation of this length and breadth is difficult to summarize, but the following key findings attempt to capture this rich and variegated discussion.

General landscape

Mastery of new and emerging technologies is key to success in 21st century economic competition and global leadership. There is much talk about those technologies’ impact on “the balance of power,” but a fundamental question remains: The power to do what?

Technological prowess is vital not only to national defense and dominance, but also to provide a bulwark against interference by authoritarian governments in domestic and personal affairs.

Democracies are losing their historical influence over technology development, standard-setting, and limiting proliferation relative to the growing capacity of authoritarian competitors, but this can be corrected.

Japan has made national economic statecraft a priority but has considerable work to do to deal with the suite of issues associated with creating and effectively exploiting emerging technologies.

The ubiquity of many of these technologies and government initiatives like China’s Military-Civil Fusion (MCF) erase historical distinctions between military and civilian use. Traditional export controls focus on protecting military and dual-use items. The growing difficulty in distinguishing between military and civilian end-use and end-users makes export controls challenging to apply, and ineffective in practice.

Emerging technologies

Despite growing attention to emerging technologies in the US and Japan and acknowledgement of the need for coordinated action to regulate their use, disparities between the two countries in terms of knowledge about, impact of, and proficiency in these technologies inhibit coordinated action.

Uncertainties inherent in the development of “emerging technologies” make regulation of their use and control of their dissemination difficult, if not impossible. Identifying the appropriate technology to control is also problematic, and there is agreement that “casting the net” too wide will inhibit innovation.

There is an inherent tension between a desire for international collaboration to spur innovation and the perceived need to control access to technologies to preserve economic and security-related advantages, particularly to prevent their diversion by or to other countries.

While there is an instinct in the US to decouple economic exchange from perceived adversaries to prevent technology leakage, connections afford the US and its allies a window into the work of perceived adversaries and prevent surprise – both economic and strategic.

Economic incentives to get new technologies to market as quickly as possible may undermine the readiness of entrepreneurs to build in safety, security, and ethics. The declining cost of new technologies and their increasing availability to the public democratize access to dangerous tools and create a leveling effect among nations.

Cyberspace

If data is “the new oil” – and there was little dissent about this – then the norms and regulations regarding its “ownership” and/or use will be vital to success in the 21st century economy. Coordination among governments that facilitate or inhibit sharing of such data is critical.

We are only beginning to understand how data processing outcomes can be influenced by the types of algorithms used. Ostensibly “neutral” algorithms can prejudice decision-making by incorporating subtle but important biases. Even nontechnical policy people should seek to shine light into the algorithm “black box” to understand what assumptions are being made.

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated demand for better cybersecurity practices – and made plain the alarming gap in both the capacity and the will to implement those practices. At the same time, the pandemic-triggered recession has forced companies to cut their cybersecurity budgets just as they have increased spending on IT capabilities to account for a surge in remote working arrangements.

Be wary of comparisons of who is “winning” cyber or technology races. Much depends on the metrics used and assumptions about the nature of the competition. The “race” metaphor also obscures the importance of international collaboration and reduces the equation to a zero sum.

Identifying and thinking about cyberspace as a separate military domain on par with air, sea land, or space encourages clarity in relevant decision making – whether civilian, military, government, or private. On the other hand, such a distinction risks obscuring the fact that cyberspace is intrinsic to, and fully permeates, the other domains.

As governments attempt to secure national cyber networks, small- and medium-size businesses continue to struggle to protect themselves from cyberattacks. Their shortage of cybersecurity resources makes them vulnerable to cyberattacks, and both government and industry-driven initiatives have been launched to help these smaller businesses enhance their cybersecurity.

There is a tension between resilience and deterrence in national security planning for cyberspace. While technology is often the focus of security concerns, the human factor must not be overlooked. Trust may be the key concept in developing secure cyber networks.

Robotics

While there is concern about the role of robots or autonomous weapons on the battlefield and their impact on human control and delivery of intended effects, advocates counter that autonomous weapons can be discriminating and more accurate than humans, creating less collateral damage.

Public sensitivity to (or aversion toward) the application of advanced technologies in the national security space has kept some researchers (many Japanese but also some American) from considering the military applications of their work.

Semiconductors, 3-D Printing, and Supply Chains

Japan is several years behind the world in adopting additive manufacturing practices like 3-D printing. While 3-D printing offers many advantages, problems persist in acquiring the necessary raw materials for printing at scale. Effective utilization of 3-D printing will require more and better education about this technology.

The US has much to learn from Asia about reviving its manufacturing sector and resourcing supply chains.

Given a 60-70% cost differential between manufacturing in the US and China, relocating low-cost production out of China makes little sense in a short-term analysis that relies solely on cost. Yet there are competing and sometimes compelling longer-term factors to consider, such as geopolitical relations, political risk, and the security of supply chains in a crisis. Establishing new supply chains demands close attention to these factors.

For the US, a “National Manufacturing Guard,” modeled after the National Guard, may be one way to ensure the availability of manufacturing capacity in a crisis such as a global pandemic.

Quantum Technology

While impressive progress has been made, the world is a long way from a game-changing quantum computing capability. Small quantum computing capabilities may appear in the next three to five years, but the potential – and the hype – outpaces the technology.

It is too early to tell which quantum technologies will have an impact on national security, and different states are pursuing different lines of effort. Japan, China, and the EU are prioritizing quantum communications, which might improve the security of encrypted communications. The US and a few other countries are focusing on quantumcomputing, which could threaten the security of encrypted communication, as well as provide useful commercial applications.

It is also too early to set broad international standards for quantum technologies. Instead, it may make more sense to focus on limited cooperation among allies or like-minded countries.

Biotechnology

Biotechnology proliferation poses new security threats as nefarious actors will be able to access these capabilities soon.

While most of the focus of biotechnology is on medical and health-related products, it is estimated that more than 60% of physical inputs into the global economy can be replaced by biological production.

A shift to biological production can yield profound reductions in energy, water use, and land use, along with substantial cuts in “food miles” (the distance from production to the table).

For new types of food production, economies of scale are not everything: there is room for individual or startup competitiveness. However, supply capacity is a key limiter, particularly with regard to amino acids and water.

While Japan has been developing biotechnologies, gains have been limited by bureaucratic factionalism and stove-piping between government departments.

Areas of Cooperation

Technology can only be successfully managed through whole-of-government and whole-of-society approaches. Policymakers should promote coordinated action between allies, partners and like-minded states, where technology-generated impacts have their most far-reaching effects.

The US-Japan Cooperation Dialogue on the Internet Economy, which included discussions with private-sector representatives, is a best practice for US-Japan cooperation. The exchange of ideas among industry, government, and academia will create an open architecture highlighting the values of transparency, vendor diversity, and standardization, creating market opportunities for US and Japanese vendors and benefitting third countries by improving supply chain security.

The fundamental challenge the US and Japan face in 5G competition is a lack of attractive, alternative options to very cheap technologies offered by China to third countries. An area of focus for the US and Japan in 5G should be R&D collaboration to ensure multi-vendor interoperability on technology challenges. Our countries should also be thinking to develop 6G technology, in particular multilateral and bilateral industry consortiums for standard-setting.

One important lesson from the US-Japan trade and technology competition of the 1980s is that the US exaggerated the “threat” from a highly capable competitor to a point that it almost missed opportunities to work together for mutual benefit. (The allies should not lose sight of opportunities to do so with China.)

The US needs an accurate understanding of government involvement in industrial development.  The vital role that Washington played in creating what came to be known as Silicon Valley is often downplayed to foster a myth of “entrepreneurial independence” and advance ideological positions that are not based on history.

Alignment between the US and Japan on trade, investment, and technology controls is necessary. Otherwise, attempts to address shared security concerns will generate friction between our two countries. One vital step Japan can make is developing more sophisticated procedures to handle classified information, including a security clearance system. As a first step, the US and Japan should update their science and technology agreement signed in 1988.

要旨

パシフィック・フォーラムは、2020年10月、東京の米国大使館、多摩大学ルール形成戦略研究所、慶應義塾大学グローバルリサーチインスティテュート、沖縄科学技術大学院大学と共に「革新的技術と日米同盟」について約1ヶ月間に亘るバーチャル形式のパネルディスカッションを行った。280名を超える参加者が、人工知能や自動運転、ビッグデータ、サイバーセキュリティ、ドローン、量子コンピューティング、ロボット、3D造形技術等をテーマにした10回のセッション(7つの非公開セッションと3つの公開セッション)に参加した。これだけ長期に亘る幅広い議論を要約することは困難だが、この豊かで多様な議論を総括する試みとして以下にその要点を示す。

昨今の国際情勢

21世紀の経済競争や国際的なリーダーシップにおいて成功を収めるには、新技術及び新興技術を制することが極めて重要である。これらの技術が「バランス・オブ・パワー」に与える影響については多く語られてきた。しかし、根本的な問いは残ったままである。つまり、一体何をするためのパワーなのかという問いである。

技術力は、国防や覇権にとって重要なだけでなく、他国の内政や個人のプライバシー等の領域に対する権威主義国家による干渉及び介入行為への防壁にもなる。

権威主義的な競争相手の能力が増大しているのに対して、民主主義国家は技術革新や規格の設定、拡散の防止に対するその歴史的な影響力を失いつつある。しかし、この状況は是正することができる。

日本はエコノミック・ステイトクラフトを優先事項としてきたが、新たな技術の創造、効果的な運用に関連したこれらの問題に対処する為に一段の努力が必要である。

これらの技術の遍在性、中国の軍民融合のような政府の取り組みにより、軍事用と民生用の歴史的な区別が付かなくなっている。従来の輸出管理は軍事品目とデュアルユース品目を保護することに焦点を当てていた。しかし、最終的な使用用途とエンドユーザーを軍または民に区別することは困難になってきており、それにより輸出管理は適用することが難しく、実際運用上効果がないものとなっている。

新興技術

日米間においては、新興技術への注目が高まり、これら新興技術の利用を規制するために協調して行動することの必要性が認識されているにもかかわらず、両者の間にはこれら技術に対する認識、影響力、技術レベルに差があるため協調行動が妨げられている。

「新興技術」の開発に内在する不確実性により、「新興技術」の利用を規制しその普及を管理することが不可能ではないにしても困難なものとなっている。また、管理されるべき技術の選定も困難であり、「網を広げすぎる」ことはイノベーションを阻害するという合意がある。

イノベーションを促進するための国際的な協力が望まれる一方、経済及び安全保障上の優位を維持するために技術へのアクセスを制御し、特に他国による転用及び他国への流出を防ぐ必要があるという認識があり、そこには難しい釣り合いが存在する。

米国においては技術流出を防ぐために、敵対国と目される国家との経済的交流を分断しようとする傾向がある一方で、そのような国家間関係を維持することは、米国とその同盟国が敵対国と目される国家の動向を把握し、経済的及び戦略的な不意打ちを防止することを可能にする。

新たな技術をできるだけ早く市場に出したいという経済的インセンティブは、安全、安全保障、及び倫理的観点を勘案する意思を低下させる可能性がある。さらに、新技術のコストが低下し、危険なツールへのアクセス可能性が高まったことが国家間に平準化効果をもたらしている。

サイバー空間

もしデータが「新たな石油」であるとするならば(これに関しては参加者からほとんど異論がなかった)、その利用や「所有権」に関する規制や規範は21世紀の経済的成功に不可欠なものとなるだろう。このようなデータ共有の促進または抑制を行う政府間の調整が不可欠である。

私たちはデータ処理に関して、用いられるアルゴリズムの種類が結果にどのような影響を与えるかを理解し始めたばかりだ。微妙ではあるが重要なバイアスが組み込まれていることにより、表面上は「中立的」なアルゴリズムであっても、意思決定に影響をもたらしうる。技術分野ではない政策担当者であっても、アルゴリズムという「ブラックボックス」に焦点を当て、どのような前提のもとに組まれているのかを理解しようとする必要がある。

COVID-19のパンデミックはより良いサイバーセキュリティの実装への要求をさらに高め、技術的な能力とそれら実装に対する意思との間における深刻な差があることを明らかにした。同時に、パンデミックに端を発した不況により、各企業はサイバーセキュリティのための予算を削減する一方、リモートワークの急増に対応するため情報通信設備への支出を増加させている。

サイバー分野や技術分野での競争において誰が「勝っている」のか、という比較については注意を払わなければならない。多くは使用している指標や競争に関する前提に依拠しているからだ。また「競争」という比喩は国際的な協力の重要性を不明瞭にし、ゼロサム的な考え方に至ってしまう。

サイバー空間を陸、海、空、宇宙と同様に独立した軍事領域として認識し、考えることは関連する事項の意思決定を明確にすることにつながる。これは文民、軍、政府、民間を問わない。一方でこのような区別のあり方は他の領域にもサイバー空間が内在し深く浸透しているという事実を不明瞭にしてしまいかねない。

政府が国家レベルでのサイバーネットワークの安全性を確保しようとしている一方、中小企業はサイバー攻撃から身を守るのに苦労し続けている。彼らはサイバーセキュリティに関するリソースが不足しているためサイバー攻撃に対して脆弱であり、これらの中小企業がサイバーセキュリティを強化できるように支援するための取り組みが、政府と産業界の両方によって立ち上げられている。

サイバー空間に関する国家安全保障計画においては、強靭性と抑止のどちらを重視するかについて議論がなされている。技術が安全保障課題の焦点となることが多いが、人的要因も見落としてはならない。安全なサイバーネットワークを構築する上で、信頼が鍵となるコンセプトかもしれない。

ロボティクス

戦場におけるロボット又は自律型兵器の役割や、人間による制御や意図した行為の実行に対する影響については懸念があるが、自律型兵器は人間よりも識別能力や精度において優れており、戦闘による副次的な被害が少ないという議論もある。

最先端の科学技術を国家安全保障へ応用することに対する世間の懸念(または嫌悪感)により、一部の科学者(多くは日本人であるが、一部の米国人も)は自らの研究の軍事利用を考慮していない。

半導体、3D造形技術、サプライチェーン

日本は3D造形技術に代表されるようなアディティブ・マニュファクチャリング技術(原料を積層・付加することによって成型する技術―訳者註)の導入において、世界から数年後れをとっている。3D造形技術には多くの利点があるが、一方で大規模な造形を行う際の原料調達において依然課題が残る。将来的に3D造形技術を有効に活用するためには、本技術に関する教育が必要となるだろう。

米国は、製造業の復活とサプライチェーンの再構築について、アジアから学ぶべきことが多い。

製造業における米国と中国のコスト差が60~70%であることを踏まえると、コストのみに立脚した短期的な分析では、低コストの製造拠点を中国から移転させることはほとんど意味を成さない。むしろ、地政学的関係、政治的リスク、危機的状況におけるサプライチェーンの安全性など、競争的で時に強制力のある、考慮すべき長期的な要因がある。新たなサプライチェーンを確立する際には、これらの要因に細心の注意を払わなくてはならない。

米国においては、地球規模のパンデミックのような危機的状況において製造能力を確保するために州兵のような「国家製造部隊」を立ち上げるのも一つの手かもしれない。

量子技術

目を見張るべき進歩があったとはいえ、現時点において革新的と言えるような量子技術には未だ遠く及ばない。小型の量子コンピューティング技術は3〜5年後に登場するかもしれないが、現行技術はその潜在的な応用可能性(と誇大評価)に達していない。

量子技術におけるどの分野が国家安全保障に影響を与えるのかを判断することは時期尚早であり、各国は各々異なる分野に注力している。日本、中国、EUは暗号化通信の安全性を向上させる可能性のある量子通信を優先している。米国と他の数カ国は、暗号化通信のセキュリティを脅かすと共に、有用な商業利用ももたらす可能性のある量子コンピューティングに注目している。

また、量子技術の広範な国際基準を設定することも時期尚早である。それよりも同盟国や同志国との間での限定的な協力に焦点を当てることの方が有効かもしれない。

バイオテクノロジー

バイオテクノロジーの拡散は新たな安全保障上の懸念を引き起こしており、悪意を持ったアクターがこれらの技術を利用できるようになる日も近い。

今日、バイオテクノロジーにおける焦点の大部分は医療・健康関連製品であるが、世界経済における物理的に取引されるものの内60%以上がバイオ関連の製品に置き換わると推定されている。

バイオ関連の製品へのシフトはエネルギー、水、及び土地の利用の大幅な削減を生み出すと共に、「フードマイル」(生産から食卓までの距離)を短縮することができる。

新しい食品の生産方法においては、規模の経済がすべてではない。個人やスタートアップの競争力にも余地がある。しかし、供給能力が主要な制限要因となる。特にアミノ酸と水に関して顕著である。

日本はバイオテクノロジー分野の開発を進めてきたが、その成果は省庁間における派閥主義と縦割り行政により限定的なものとなっている。

協力できる分野

技術は政府全体、そして社会全体的なアプローチによってはじめて有効に管理することができる。政策立案者は技術の生み出す効果が最も広範囲に行き渡るように、同盟国や協力国及び同志国との協力を促進しなくてはならない。

民間企業の代表者を含む「インターネットエコノミーに関する日米政策協力対話」は日米協力における最良の事例である。

産官学の意見交換は、透明性やベンダーの多様性、標準化の価値を重視した開かれた産業構造を作り出し、日米のベンダーに市場機会を創出し、サプライチェーンの安全性を向上させることで第三国に利益をもたらす。

5G 競争において米国と日本が直面している根本的な課題は、中国が第三国に提供している非常に安価な技術に代わるような魅力的な選択肢がないことである。5Gにおいて日米が焦点とすべきは、技術課題に対するマルチベンダーの相互運用性を確保するための共同研究開発である。日米はまた、6G技術の開発、特に規格設定のための産業界での多者間及び二者間のコンソーシアムについて考えるべきである。

1980 年代の日米貿易及び技術競争からの重要な教訓の一つは、米国が有力な競争相手からの「脅威」を誇張しすぎて、協力して相互に利益を得るチャンスをほとんど見逃してしまったことである。(米国の同盟国は中国との協力という観点を見失うべきではない。)

米国は、産業開発における政府の関与について正しく理解しなくてはならない。「起業家の自助自立」という神話を維持し、史実に基づかないイデオロギー的な立場が推し進める為に、シリコンバレーの誕生において米国連邦政府が果たした重要な役割はしばしば過小評価されている。

貿易、投資、技術管理に関して日米間の調整が必要である。そうでなければ、共通の安全保障上の懸念に対処しようとする試みは、両国間の摩擦を生むことになる。日本ができる重要なステップの一つは、セキュリティ・クリアランス制度を含めた、機密情報を扱うためのより洗練された体制を構築することである。その第一歩として、日米両国は1988年に署名した科学技術協定を更新すべきである。

より詳しい情報についてはクリスタル・プライアー(crystal@pacforum.org)またはブラッド・グロッサーマン(brad@pacforum.org)に連絡してください。本書に記載された意見は各カンファレンスのオーガナイザーによるものであり、必ずしも全参加の意見を反映させたものではありません。

Edited by Brad Glosserman, Crystal Pryor, and Riho Aizawa

Japanese translations by Harunari Soeda, Yu Inagaki, and Erika Hongo

Download the full PDF of Issues & Insights Vol. 21, SR 1 – 21st Century Technologies, Geopolitics, and the US-Japan Alliance: Recognizing Game-changing Potential